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for us. if you will do something on stem education, qualified members help us identify companies from understanding of their home markets. we work with local chambers, members of congress, and we have developed a network of convenience, local business leaders better interested in participating and know how to recruit people. so far we are brought more than two thousand people to the white house this year alone representing more than 500 towns and cities, probably around 1800 companies. out of 10 our ceo's. two out of 10 are investors. host: scott. georgia. republican. caller: i may health insurance broker and i have a couple of the employees and a comment on the aca. i agree and something had to be done on health care costs, but this will just add fuel to the fire. part of the provisions that have yet to come into effect, one of which requires the highest ratio from three-to-one, that is your lowest rate cannot be any higher than three times your lowest rate. so, if you have a 64-year-old and a 19-year-old, you can not charge the real cost because the risk factors for a 19-year-old ar
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
with some employers who might not agree with future education. >> and a little bit of a rebound shaping up on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." i'm kelly evans. progress is reportedly being made in talk toes avoid the u.s. fiscal cliff. another top republican lawmakers offers an olive branch to the white house. >>> and sylvia berlusconi accuses the current premier as being german-centric. >>> and the dfw returns to a new year high. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange." bringing us business news from around the globe. >>> 13220 is the level of the dow. the nasdaq is trying to add five of six points. we're seeing a bit of a rebound shaping up here in the red. the ftse global 300 is up about .2%. for the most part, it's all green across europe. the ftse 1100 adding .2%. the xetra dax and cac 40 in germany, paris, better than .5%. up 1% after falling double that yesterday. we're seeing gains in italy and portugal, ross, as invest everies have now perhaps priced in the latest turmoil in italy. >> absolutely. meanwhile, unemployment may have ticked down 7..7%. 10.9% for t
is in the budget issue. they think you can balance the budget by cutting. i have seen a lot of educational initiatives go on, but they do not necessarily seem to have any legs. how do we get the american public to understand the debate we had here today? it was a lot more agreement than debate. >> alison and i participated in a fiscal wake up tour. a fiscal solutions tour. now we are doing the next generation of that. we did in september and october of this year. what you have to do is build a burning platform. you have to understand the kinds of polls most politicians listen to our superficial and grossly misleading. when the public is asked, do you want to work longer for social security? do you want to pay higher premiums for medicare? do you want to pay more taxes? what do you expect them to say? my point is, when you build a burning platform case, which can be done in 10 minutes, and i have done it thousands of times, they get it. that is when you get 97% off to be the top priority, 92% agree on the principles, 85% weighted towards the spending, so what does that mean? the biggest def
from budget cuts. florida hack looking to reform education in the state. your college major greatly affects how much money you make. according to the census data, engineering majors earn $3.5 million over a 40-year career, more than the median earnings for all majors, $2.4 million. those with education majors earn the least, $1.8 million. brooke? >>> bottom of the hour here, i'm brooke baldwin. thanks for being with me. you see the crowds, you see the president. he's speaking at redford, michigan, not too far from detroit. take a listen. >> so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world, you've got -- you've also got all this cool equipment. i want to try out some of the equipment. but secret service wouldn't let me. they said you're going to drop something on your head. hurt yourself. they were worried i would mess something up. and i -- they may not admit it, but i'm pretty sure they were happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [ applause ] so it's now safe for you to turn your te
with educations, people with brains and a knowledge of american history, who come out and argue that this is something that should be put on the table. >> yeah. i guess brains and an education but still somehow profoundly ignorant, and they're emblematic of if not the ignorant people in the republican people, at least people who will pander to that ignorance. it's apiece of birtherism, the climate change is a hoax, if you cut taxes for rich people, magically the economy revives. it's magical thinking, and we're in the thrall of magical thinkers. the republican party has to follow their magical thinkers. because they do, the rest of the national conversation gets distorted and pulled way over to the right. that's what's happening. >> ron, i love the way you suggest that the real patriots are the ones who want to secede from the united states. it reminds me -- we once had a priest named father feeney. he didn't like the church's view because the church didn't support no salvation outside the church. so he leaves the church. that's just like -- wait a minute, you're one of them now
on how best to educate and otherwise care for their children with disabilities, and another provision of the treaty that can be read to obligate the united states government to pay for abortion services. >> you're just interpreting things. it never uses the word abortion, it basically says that disabled people should have the same access to health care that other people have, non-disabled people have overseas, again, we're talking about overseas. >> it does refer to reproductive rights and reproductive rights in this context has been interpreted to include abortion, and this is -- >> interpreted by you. >> -- an interpretation -- yes, and a number of other people who looked at it as well. the point is that if this does mean something, and if it could mean something that could impact u.s. law. >> but this treaty states it's not self-executing. and the u.s. supreme court has said that a non-self executing treaty doesn't create obligations that could be enforced in u.s. federal courts. >> the fact that it may be non-self executing, anderson, doesn't mean that it doesn't have any impact a
reform. >> rose: right. >> i think really looking at regulatory structures, educational structures, things like that. >> rose: but that costs money. >> i needs to be revisited. the look, i think we've got to get kind of the $4 trillion thing behind us and then -- but it's not like the government shouldn't invest in anything one of the things that has come out of every jobs council i've been a part of that is almost universal until the b.r.t. is that that thisntoury needs to invest in infrastructure. this is something that the president and the b.r.t., jobs councils, all agree but it runs into problems because what's -- the funding structure going to be? how do we pay for it and things like that? >> rose: that's the potential for growth and growth is the essential thing. build the infrastructure, build the education. >> anybody doesn't that doesn't think once we do this four trillion dollar down payment that growth isn't the most important thing is crazy. so that's what we have to be looking at for broader tax reform. >> rose: and simpson-bowles is a good guideline? >> i think simps
and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, it wasn't just that we would crowd out private capital. it was that we would crowd out public investment in the future, in children come in modern infrastructure, and innovation. when we decide we agree to cut spending, which we need to as but in larger deficit reduction. those of you who care about innovation need to care about how you cut, how did this spending. -- how you do spending. we have cut domestic d
educated whites has decreased, decreased by four years. and now the argument is that we can increase the medicare eligibility age to 67 because people are living longer. hello? who is living longer, those who have higher incomes. those who don't, those who work with their hands, whether they are a made cleaning a hotel room, a farmer or a coal miner or any other task which is labor-intensive and physical labor-intensive. by the time they are at 65, their body is broken and to deny them the opportunity, i can tell you everybody i meet who's not 65, wants to live long enough to get to 65 and medicare. and so for our republican friends, their principal negotiator has put on the table, the speaker of the house has put on the table, let's raise the eligibility age. january, you were talking about this earlier. this is a fundamental dichotomy in how we value our seniors, how we value each other, how we are compassionate. ms. jackson lee: can i say one thing and then step away, i'm glad you used the statistic of a white male, because i want this to be holistic. you did it on income. there a
schoolteacher who spent the better part of 40 years educating our children. she deserves and needs to e retire next year. she's 64. i'm here for darlene, a -- [inaudible] native who receives her life saving blood pressure medication through medicare part d. i'm here for alice, an african-american grandmother of ten who receives treatment for her diabetes through medicaid. this woman worked her whole life in the hotel industry. i'm here for my friend mark who owns a small business. he's a construction manager. >> ma'am, ma'am, i'm going to ask you to sit down so we can have this discussion. >> i'm happy to leave -- [inaudible] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> we're gonna vote -- [inaudible] the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! >> okay. i'm gonna take a moment to try to, um, talk, and we'll see if it works. i don't know if other people are here. but i actually think that what we just saw is, um, a true reflection of how hard what we're trying to do is. i'm real
and a passion for public service and education. i am deeply saddened by her passing and know that her legacy of service will live on. yvonne kennedy was born on january 8, 1945, in mobile, alabama, to leroy and thelma kennedy. at a young age she displayed a commitment to academic excellence and upon graduating from high school earned her bachelors degree from alabama state university, a masters degree from morgan state university, and a ph.d. from the university of alabama. these early accomplishments were the beginning of an illustrious career, both as a lawmaker and a community leader. first elected to the alabama state house of representatives in a special election in 1979, dr. kennedy was one of the longest serving members of the alabama state legislature. she served the 97th district of mobile for more than 33 years. she was a prominent lawmaker who fought against alabama's egregious voter i.d. laws and she championed the voter rights for rehabilitated ex-felons. she was the chair of alabama's black caucus and was well respected by her colleagues. her tireless commitment to public servi
is awarded based on skills, experience, and education. maybe that's the answer. maybe it isn't. in a country that's always favored the underdog, we haven't really put much thought into this, have we? this fiscal cliff fight is going to end one way or another and then the real work begins. immigration reform is ahead. let's keep the conversation going. find us on facebook and twitter. our handle is cnn bottom line. "cnn saturday morning" continues now with the top stories we're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." some are calling it the next roe v. wade or brown v. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the onl
. beyonce sound like she has a fifth grade education, she can't talk. excuse me, i said i am a fan. we have to call a spade a spade. >> that's what is interesting. she is known for being a straight talker. beyonce does have the documentary coming out. going to show behind the scenes vufz h views of her life, baby blue ivy, business projects. will air february 16 on hbo. beyonce's rep did not comment. and williams decleanined to comment. you know, i love beyonce. some times difficult to understand what she says. she's got that very -- >> i am not going there. you and wendy can go out on the limb. >> i love beyonce. she does have a certain drawl that makes her a little difficult to understand. >> a really uncomfortable moment at a cocktail party one of these days with the two meeting. we love beyonce. >> we do. we do. williams calls it like she sees them. lake i do. >> you got to hand it to her if she is going to disht o it out. dish it to any body. she can take it too. >> she can take it? >> i worked with wendy when she did her radio show. one of her legal eagles. i dished it to her. she cou
journeys and their "not so straight lines." here's author and educator, lou heckler. >> how many of you are now doing what you thought you'd be doing when you first went to work? i'll guess maybe about 25%. i was reminded of this recently when i spoke to a group of dentists about leadership. we talked about how they got into dentistry because they liked working with their hands, they liked helping people. and now? now, they also negotiate building leases, and manage staffs, and cope with shrinking reimbursements and the soft economy. my first job as a manager involved leading 17 people in a television news department. one of my old college friends surprised me by asking: how does it feel to be out of the news business? i only later realized he meant that all of us who have the privilege of leading others soon realize that leading is our job. that once-straight line we visualized where our skills were needed has zigs and zags in it. the skills we now need to learn and hone and practice have changed. its a wonderful honor to be at the top of an organization, but the old concept of straigh
for maryland students. vocabulary results are above the national average. maryland educators say they are not surprised. more on-line classes continue to arrive in baltimore county. dallas dance told students at the district could get between $30 million and $40 million to start up the project. school systems would help to close the achievement gap with the money. >> we would be able to put every single course the kids would need to graduate online. >> 61 school systems are in the running for the federal dollars including baltimore city. >> 5:36. things really do get better with age, according to a study, including your well-being. you should turn that frown upside down. >> the real reason we enjoy our goal to pleasures so much. >> don't forget to e-mail us your response to our water cooler question of the day. are you spending more or less this holiday shopping season? you can share your response at and on our facebook page, or send us an e-mail to >> how of the area roads shaping >> how of the area roads shaping up maddy, come on. we got a new
d from the university of chicago. that's how it happened. it was like 10 guys. i miss 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you know you mentioned the justice component of a lot of islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is response to the corruption of these u.s. sponsored regimes and in the case of gaza, which he mentioned was a very serious component. any thoughts on how to combat that were placed in the right direction? >> for the record, i am against corruption. i just wanted to clear that up. yes, look, it goes back to the point i thought i made in my remarks that islamists didn't win. i'm not islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose they screwing up the delivery of services. in this by being so corrupt. they lose and islamists are there like they've been for 80 years, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity through violence or nonviolence. we didn't even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, wh
paying deficit while still investing in education and research that are important to growing our economy and if we are serious about protecting middle class families then we are going to have to ask the wettiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> higher tax rate, of course, at issue and whether or not as republicans had hoped they could just close loopholes and tax deductions and that could. >> he keep say the wealthiest americans but $250,000 that's not the wealthest of america. >> right. so there was some word during the campaign when joe biden let slip that $1 million would be the threshold for which they would begin to tax the wealthest americans. marco rubio on a saturday morning addressed as well. they are going after each other. senator marco rubio and president obama in these dueling addresses. >> we must get the national debt under control. taxes will not solve our 16 trillion-dollar debt. only economic growth and form of entitlement programs will control the debt. woe must reform the job killing tax code by getting rid of unjustif
the controversy started. he said i'm a proud south korean, and i was educated in america. lived there for a very significant part of the life, i understand the sacrifices of the american servicemen and women, i made these comments as part of a deeply-emotional reaction to the killing of iraqis, and it was part of the overall anti-war sentiment shared by others, but he says he deeply regrets the inflammatory and inappropriate language he used. we're taking your thoughts on it on twitter. follow me @megyn kelly. brad, dick, good debate, as always. >> thanks. megyn: after major protests in the birthplace of organized labor, there are reports that president obama will use part of his speech in detroit today to take the side of unions in the explosive right-to-work fight that is emerging in michigan. they're saying this could become the next wisconsin in terms of the uniitem battles. -- on union battles. how the rules there just changed and why. >>> plus, why folks are saying this is the best video you will see all day. >> there's a group of people around, and a little thing on the ground, at first i
you, to educate. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. do we pay too much attention to apple? do we pay too much attention to the fiscal cliff excluding everything else? with the dow up 15 points, nasdaq rising 5.30%. we talk about how the transports farewell, or how i like the new honey well application. where you should buy the aig over the dip. it's fun for us to puzzle over the strength of hewlett packard. deckers down $3 because of the warm weather impact on uggss that what's behind coach today? that's what i regard as productive use of my time. but unfortunately, that's not the case for many of you and in many ways, it's not what you need to hear. in fact all those issues i just mentioned, aren't even mildly important after the big things we battle every day. first let's tackle the fiscal cliff. i'm beginning to hear a ton of blow back about how he talk about it too much. jim, give it a rest, will you? i'm getting a feel of how our rise above campaign is still warm, because the politicians aren't going to rise above, stop kidding yourself cramer. yes, yes, yes to my mono vacati withou
, today's bill is modeled after the work done by jim webb after the education opportunity program that dan took advantage of when he was just a young boy. senator akaka was chairman of the veterans' affairs committee from 2007 to 2010, has thousands and thousands iraqi and afghanistan veterans were coming home from combat. as democrats collectively worked to bring our troops home from iraq, dan akaka has labored with the veterans administration to meet the needs and challenges of a new generation of veterans. the 21st century g.i. bill ensures those veterans get the opportunities they deserve. he so valued his own education, he went on to serve his community as a teacher after he graduated from college and became a principal, worked for the department of health, education and waverly and -- and welfare and hawaii office of education and opportunity. he won election to the senate in 199o. as chairman of the indian affairs committee dan has been an advocate for native americans. he has taught us all about history, history of hawaii and its native communities as well as issues facing indigeno
, whether paper orwhat not has to be compostable. that is education we have to have. dig out a phone book from the '70s hasn't been turned not compostable of anything, paper or otherwise has to be. you're using an argument that people used against styrofoam, big mac and whopper containers. it will cost more money. it wl put the guys out of business. they were all over your streets it back in the early 80s and '90s those coanies have done very well. i know you put up the bag and say, you hold up the bag and say you love the bag. someone doing that with styrofoam containers 15 or 20 years ago melissa: hang on i have to get a few words in here too. this is disagree with me. >> goahead. melissa: takes 91% more energy to recycle paper bag than plastic bag. i worry about that. so much easier to recycle bags. every store i go into the new york, when you walk to the front door to your left a full container has bags when people brought back. when i bring back a plalastic back i use it deat i don't buy bags for trash bins in my house. i use this. not like people take them and throw them away. gohe
next year. >> there are skills that have left the u.s. not necessarily education, but stopped producing that. >> how do we get that back is this. >> it's a converted effort to get them back. and with this project that i've talked about are we do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is another good step for us. >> software sales declining by 11% from last year, still better than 13% drop analysts had been expecting. hardware sales were down 13% while accessories dropped by 8%. >> and the john mcafee saga continues to unfold. the software guru is now back in a detention center in guatemala. he was taken to a hospital yesterday for what his lawyer described as two mild heart attacks. mcafee's attorney says his client suffers from anxiety and hypertension. the software pay near is being held by guatemalan authorities for entering the country illegally from belize. he fled belize after authority wanted to question him about the death of one of his neighbors. mcafee said the police were behind all of this, he's been set up in all of this, but he's also -- >> tattoo on his arm. >
, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in
constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
services social workers and other relationship that allows them to do with this tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. i think that is where we look at our responsibility is to help them navigate that decision. it's a personal decision and a hard decision about that decision be the family members and provider. we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that is not promising is the right way to do it. so you take it from a cost discussion to quality-of-life discussion. when you make the quality-of-life discussion, the cost discussion will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what is going to lead to efficiencies to eliminate waste and bring down cost of the entire health care system. >> you probably just answer the question you're trying to ask me 50 different times. >> but devil is in the details. who's going to answer these questions to better care is provided or not? in less than someone ago that ensure insurance come in as we had to go to a primary care doctor to get permission to go to a specialist. is it the primar
-higher education, infrastructure, they were liberal in their politics and progressive. they were deeply anti- segregationist and in jim crow. built in that area something called the research triangle that depended on education, higher education, and which has paid huge dividends and opened the road to the new south, as we think of it today. my father would have been coming in 2008, would have been so proud to see barack obama elected in north carolina, to see the state go for barack obama. sadly, it was not to happen again in 2012, although we worked hard at it. anyway, my first campaign that i actually was involved with was mcgovern in 1972. i think my wife kim has the bumper sticker that says "don't blame me, i'm from massachusetts." i think massachusetts was the only state to go for mcgovern, sadly. kim also took a year off between high-school and college and a ring doorbells and called people up for that at the field office in upstate new york. i worked with carol king and barbra streisand. we did a couple of concerts. it was 3/4 mcgovern as a time signature, me, and carol, and a barbara
with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army barely survived an epic the punishing winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other pump demolishes these myths and gives us an award centered around morristown new jersey and the watch on mountain. yes, you heard me right. i wore a% of which was fought on a terrain visible from the top of the empire state building. truth be told, however, as well as admiration, i have a grievance upon with both -- we're both irish and writers so we have to have grievances. i have been heard and deeply disappointed and a personal level by juan ponce books. five years ago in the fall of 2007i reviewed how not to get rich. i praised it as a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective 70 in whi
in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been talking about the latest in the fiscal curve saga. that includes, at this moment, talk of a compromise that may or may not be in the works. an increase in the top marginal tax rate, short of what obama has been asking for, but still an increase and changes to medicare with the eligibility age in exchange for that on the democratic side. we were talking about, from the democratic standpoint, the medicare issue. i want to talk about the rate issue. there can't be a deal, unless republicans, even on these terms can't be a deal unless republicans go along with increasing the tax rate. there hasn't been a single republican willing to vote to increase tax rates. i want to bring in a former member of mitt romney's health care advisory group. blog on forbes health care. i want to ask you about that piece of it. we have been talking about this potential deal of 37% of the top marginal tax rate. do you see a scenario where republicans would vote for that in congress? >> well, first of
level. there are models, social policy, education, welfare that have had some success out in the country that reflects conservative ideas. match that with the researchers in washington that to the policy work for heritage. connell: i think a lot of people will hear or read about this today and think about the conversation we have been having about the future of the republican party. does the tea party still have, you know, lindsey graham just put a statement out saying he is very disappointed that demint is leaving. the conservative movement lost a strong voice. he will do a great job at heritage. is this part of that story? >> i think senator demint believes that the republican message going into the election was a strong one. it just simply was not well articulated. i agree with senator demint. i do not believe that the republican party has to transform its position and become more moderate. take an idea like economic growth. the difference between 2% growth and 3.5% is a different like night and day. senator demint told me he started his career as a market researcher and advertising.
education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind of skill acquisition but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure it is her student aid programs don't stand in whether. let me give you an example. right now what we have is student aid like pell aid like pell grants or the loan programs, they have credit institutions. they don't have cr
to do the brown versus board of education of our time. >> sure. we don't know who voted to take up the proposition 8 case, right? at least four justices have to be supportive of the coming on board. could it have been for liberal justices thinking that kennedy, the presumed swing vote might be with them or those opposed to marriage equality presuming that kennedy might be with them. but i think that the court despite being above the fray, as it were it interacted with the political realities and the world, so it is standoffish but it cannot help being effected from those around us. >> stephanie: not only it is repulsive what scalia said it makes no legal sense? i'm seeing less and less legal reasoning for ruling against equal rights, aren't you? >> i think so. and i think what is most potentially chilling about the marks is you say regardless of what he may think, but what does that tell us about what he thinks and the fact he will be looking at these cases, and we're talking in particular about the proposition 8 case. but then what does it tell us about what
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)